Veterinary Feed Directive Talk!

Veterinary Feed Directives

  • Are you up to date on the new Veterinary Feed Directives?
  • Are you prepared for the changes going into effect less than two months from now, January 1, 2017?
  • Do you have questions about what this means for your farm and livestock?

Make time to attend the:

Veterinary Feed Directive Talk – Nov. 16!

 *Location change (as of 11/15/16)!! New Location: Southern States Warehouse in Catlett, VA (next to railroad tracks)

ss-vfd-talk-pic

 


Our own Dr. Julia Gibson will be joining Dr. Bob Hall (State Veterinarian) and Southern States representative David Baber to discuss this important subject and what it means for you.


 

Any of these products look familiar?

 

ss-vfd-talk-drugsss-vfd-talk-drugs2

If so, you’ll need a VFD in the future!

Bring your questions on November 16 and Dr. J, Dr. Hall, and your local Southern States will bring their answers!

 

Other large animal related questions? Call us any time at 540-788-6094!

 

Veterinary Technician Appreciation!

It’s National Veterinary Technician Appreciation Week and We LOVE our LVTs!

lvtheart2

Our Licensed Veterinary Technicians are a crucial part of our team and we don’t know what we would do without them! 

Licensed Veterinary Technicians are highly trained professionals, responsible for everything from taking patient vitals, placing IV catheters, monitoring anesthesia, taking x-rays, performing bloodwork and urine testing, administering medications and injections, caring for hospitalized patients, answering client questions, providing knowledgeable pet care education, and offering comfort during difficult visits. ALL of our staff are amazing, animal-loving people, but these ladies have gone above and beyond to get additional training (which they maintain with regular continuing education courses) so they can provide the best care for your pets.

vtw9

The National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA) designates one week a year in October to honor these animal care professionals, but our appreciation for all they do is year round. If you are lucky enough to see Sam or Erin this week, please give them a high-five or some words of thanks for all they do for us. We couldn’t do what we do without them!

vtw10

Is Anxiety Ruining Your Pet’s Summer?

This month’s Health Focus is Freedom From Anxiety!

Summer brings celebrations that often feature fireworks, explosions, and gunshots, but these things are frequently scary for our pets, who don’t understand the loud noises and bright flashes. Even if the fireworks don’t start weeks early in your neighborhood, Mother Nature is usually ready to deliver light shows of her own featuring lightning, thunder, and barometric pressure changes. Car rides or kennel boarding for summer trips can top it all off to make this a scary time of year for many pets.

Fortunately, there are a wide variety of things that can be done to help your pets be at their best and most comfortable. See below for some of the things we’re recommending this summer.

Team Up – Consult With A Vet

Our veterinarians are here to help with behavior, training, and phobias as well as your pet’s other health concerns. Set up a consult to discuss your pet’s particular fears, triggers, or problem behaviors and what can be done to help. Sometimes there is training that can help calm fears or manage frightening situations, other times there may be medications that can make things better or easier. Did you know there’s a great anti-nausea medication for pets that can calm queasy stomachs and turn that reluctant car rider into an eager copilot? Or a jacket that can help provide a snug “hug” for a pet and may make thunderstorms easier even without ANY additional medications? Our vets are here to help your pets’ well being in all ways, including their sense of comfort in stressful situations.

vetteamconsults

Pheromones – Pill-Free Relief

Pheromones are chemicals processed through a pet’s olfactory system (the same system that processes smell, such an important sense to our dogs and cats!) that can have a direct calming effect on the brain without the use of oral medications. Specific products for both dogs and cats are available, and replicate chemicals that have a calming effect on the brain. For dogs, Adaptil® products are available as collars that can be put on in the morning if the weather is calling for thunderstorms so they can work gently throughout the day. Feliway® products for cats are available in a room spritz or even set-it-and-forget-it plug-in diffusers that are especially helpful for times when you’re having house guests, or that week around the 4th of July when there are stray fireworks going off in the neighborhood.adaptilfeliway

Nutraceuticals – Calm By Nature

There are some great non-prescription products out there that can be helpful as well. Some proteins and amino acids have been studied to support our pets’ sense of calm and healthy brain chemical balance. For example, the product Zylkene® makes use of a protein from milk, and Solliquin Chews use the amino acid L-Theanine from green tea and other botanical extracts to promote balanced behavior and relaxation. While we recommend you check in with our doctors before starting on any supplement for your pet, these products are over the counter and do not require a prescription. Consider adding them to your routine to help your furry family members to be more comfortable.zylkenesolliquin

This June we are offering 50% off the Behavior Consult exam with the veterinarians, and 10% off anxiety and calming aids, including all the products mentioned above! Help you and your pets have a great summer, and call us with any questions or to schedule a consult!

 

Lyme Disease Prevention

Our health focus topic for March is Lyme Disease Awareness and Prevention! Just like humans, dogs are susceptible to Lyme disease, and can have long lasting issues from contracting this disease.

Ticks in our area carry Lyme disease, as well as other nasty blood parasites like Ehrlichia and Anaplasma. Virginia is one of the states on the East Coast with a very high prevalence of Lyme disease.

Lyme Map

Unlike humans, dogs very rarely get the “bulls-eye” lesion on their skin after a bite from an infected tick. Some dogs will get an irritated area around a tick bite whether or not the tick is carrying a disease, and others will not react at all.

The disease itself can cause fever, lethargy, achiness and arthritis, and in some cases, even permanent effects on the kidneys. Just because your dog has been exposed to Lyme disease doesn’t mean that he or she will necessary develop these symptoms. However, since some dogs do experience illness, we strongly recommend prevention for EVERY dog in our area.

Lyme infection in dogs is only detected with a blood test. We use a quick, in-hospital test that only requires a few drops of blood to screen for this disease.

Knowing your dog’s status is an important first step in preventing or treating this disease!

If your dog tests positive, our doctors will discuss with you the next options, which could include further testing or medications. If your dog tests negative, he or she is eligible to start the Lyme vaccine series to help prevent future infection!

This month, Catlett Animal Hospital will offer 10% off Lyme disease vaccination and the testing to start the vaccine!

Additionally, if your dog completes the Lyme vaccination series for the first time, you will be eligible for a FREE gift…  your choice of a travel dog water bottle or a light-up, night time safety collar! (while supplies last!)

The Lyme vaccine is an important means to prevent disease in your dog, but tick prevention is ALWAYS the best way to prevent ticks and the many diseases they can transmit. We recommend keeping your dog on tick prevention year round, as our mild climate often means ticks can be active even in the winter months.

Help us protect your dog from Lyme disease this spring!

Foaling Tips For Horse Owners: Article Three: Once The Foal Is Born

Part 3: Once the foal is born

Ready for the last article in our foaling series? Check out some tips for care of the post-partum mare and newborn foal below.

 

Mare Care

  • Post-partum examination of the mare’s reproductive tract is performed in order to decide whether or not to breed the mare again on first postpartum estrus.
  • The mare may have dark red colored vaginal discharge for about a week following foaling. If the discharge is yellow or if there is a putrid smell with the discharge, the mare may have an infection and should be treated by your veterinarian with antibiotics.
  • Owners should deworm the mare immediately following parturition to decrease the parasite load that could spread to the foal. An ivomec product is recommended for this deworming.
  • The mare will have a foal heat 5 to 14 days following foaling. Although there is a decreased pregnancy rate while breeding on foal heats, mares can get pregnant if bred at this time.
  • The mare’s energy needs are highest during lactation. At this time, she should remain on a very high plane of nutrition.
  • As long as the mare is getting enough energy through her food and your vet says she is healthy following foaling, riding can be resumed within several weeks post-partum.

Foal Care:

The first days:

  • The foal should be standing and nursing within 2 hours following birth. The first 6-12 hours of life are a crucial time for the foal. During this time, it is important that the foal drink colostrum from the mare. Colostrum, or the mare’s first milk, contains many antibodies to various pathogens and is high in fat and protein.
    • Failure of the foal to ingest colostrum is called failure of passive transfer and can be fatal for the foal.
    • In order to test that the foal took in enough colostrum, your veterinarian can run an IgG test on the foal’s blood. This is a quick stall-side test that can give much insight into the foal’s health.
    • If the foal did not receive enough colostrum, a plasma transfusion may be necessary.
  • In addition to drinking colostrum, it is important that the foal pass the meconium- or fetal stool. If the foal is unable to defecate, an enema may be necessary.
  • Within the first day of life, it is helpful for the foal to be examined by a veterinarian. Your vet can auscult the heart and lungs and can also identify any congenital problems such as a cleft palate or umbilical problems.
    • Owners should also closely monitor the umbilicus and joints for signs of disease. Often if an infection is present in the foal it will settle in the joints causing them to be hot and swollen. The umbilicus itself should also dry up and close up within several days. Owners should apply chlorohexidine to the umbilicus twice daily for the first three days. If the umbilicus becomes swollen or remains open after 3 days, contact your veterinarian
  • Overall, monitor your foal to ensure that they are getting up and moving around with the mare and that they are nursing frequently. Healthy foals will normally be spunky and playful.

Later in life:

 

  • Generally, horse owners start foal vaccination programs around 4 to 6 months of age
    • The exception may be for the Influenza vaccines, which should be administered at 6 – 9 months of age.
    • Depending on which vaccines are given, the foal may need follow-up booster shots.
    • Vaccines recommended:
      • EWT – 1x or 2x per year
      • Influenza, Rhinopneumonitis – 2 x per year
      • Rabies – 1x per year
      • WNV – 1x per year +
      • ± Potomac Horse Fever – 2x per year – April and August
      • ± Strangles – 1x or 2x per year
  • Deworming: Parasite control is very important in the foal. Foals should be dewormed with an ivermectin product starting at one month of age, and then follow up doses given every two months. It is important to have an accurate weight on the foal so that correct dose of dewormer is given. While she is nursing, the mare should also be dewormed every two months coordinating with the foal’s deworming schedule.
  • Nutrition: The foal is sustained only on the mare’s milk for the first few weeks. Following that time, the foal may begin to nibble on hay and can start to get grain. By 6 weeks, the mare’s milk production decreases and the foal will need extra feed to supplement its diet. There are many commercial formulations of grain that are proper for a growing foal.
  • Weaning: Foals normally remain on the mare for 4-6 months. After this point, they should be able consume enough other nutrition from hay and grain to sustain themselves and continue growth.
    • Weaning stress can be reduced if the foal is kept from nursing, but is still allowed to have some contact with the mare. This can be achieved by housing the mare and foal in adjoining stalls for several days so that they can still smell and hear each other.

 

Thanks for your interest in our foaling articles and in our practice. Please give us a call for any of your equine needs. 540-788-6094

1 2 3 4 5 6